If you’re looking for support, you’re in the right spot.

As part of the HPTN 096 Building Equity Through Advocacy study, you can get connected to peer support.


What is Peer Support?

Peers are trained and establish a mutually supportive and trusting relationship to address challenges, share knowledge, and connect you to resources in your community. They will listen and offer support in a respectful and nonjudgmental way, helping to empower you to make informed decisions about your sexual health.

Peer support is when people use their own experiences to help one another. It brings together people with shared lived experiences to support each other and provide a space where you feel accepted and understood.



Helping you navigate

Peer supporters will draw directly from their shared, lived and relatable experiences to offer you a safe space to receive emotional and practical support as you navigate your sexual health and well-being.

Peer supporters can provide information and help educate you on a number of sexual health topics including HIV-related topics, self-care and well-being. They are also informed about local health and support services and resources centered on Black gay, bisexual, same-gender-loving and other men who have sex with men.



What can Peer Support do for me?

  • Virtual one-on-one support from someone with a compassionate ear
  • A safe space to get things off our chest and share things with someone who will not judge you
  • Encouragement, respect, and hope from someone who walked the same path and can reassure you that you are not alone in what you are feeling!
  • New ideas and helpful approaches
  • Assistance finding services and support in your area


We’re here whenever you’re ready to talk

To be matched with a peer supporter, please fill out a confidential questionnaire and consent form using the link below. We will connect you to a peer that best fits your specific support needs.


Frequently Asked Questions

What is the HPTN 096 peer support program? 

Peers are trained to serve as role models and establish a mutually supportive relationship as someone with similar lived experiences. Peers will listen and offer support in a respectful and nonjudgmental way that promotes client empowerment and increased knowledge. They will share information and provide education on HIV-related topics and general health/well-being. Peers will also support clients in connecting them to health and support services and resources centered around Black gay, bisexual, same-gender-loving, and other men who have sex with men.

Who can take part in the peer support program?

The peer support program will offer support to Black gay, bisexual, same-gender-loving, and other men who have sex with men ages 15 years and older. Currently, the Peer Support program is available in Dallas, Texas & Montgomery, Alabama.

How does the peer support program work? 

In the peer support component, peers will draw directly from their shared, lived, and relatable experiences to offer clients with whom they have connected a safe space and opportunity to engage and provide emotional and practical support. They will offer resources to improve self-care and encourage clients to embrace health-seeking behaviors by providing wellness education and promotion. The care and attentiveness provided by peers can potentially reduce the negative influence presented by discrimination and stigma (often faced by those seeking to engage in care or other support services because of one’s race, social status, sexuality/identity, etc.).

What makes the HPTN 096 peer support program so unique? 

Peers provide unique insights from a perspective based on real-life knowledge. They will share their knowledge and provide emotional support, social interaction, or practical help to their clients. Peers will provide education and work to support linkages to tools and resources without judgment. The peer support program does not offer traditional peer navigation or case management services. The peer support program aims to remove power imbalances sometimes seen in clinical settings by providing service and support to Black gay, bisexual, same-gender-loving, and other men who have sex with men. Access to support services will be virtual and flexible. This support will be a mutual relationship built together by peers and their clients, with sessions available when needed (i.e., by phone, or email).